The Best Cameras for Glasses Wearers

If you prefer to use a viewfinder rather than the rear screen, and wear glasses like I do, some cameras just work better than others. As I mentioned recently in trying out the Fujifilm X-Pro2, there's no point in having an amazing camera if you can't compose properly in the viewfinder.

There are other solutions, such as contact lenses or setting the corrective diopter on the camera. I'm not keen on wearing contacts, and the diopter works fine to correct my vision but it's not always fast or convenient to remove my glasses. So we're left with pushing our glasses up to the viewfinder, and whether we can see all edges and all corners of the viewfinder will vary depending on the person, the glasses and the camera design.

It's easy to assume that a larger viewfinder will be best, but the factor that matters most is the 'eye point' or 'eye relief'. This is the distance from the viewfinder that the eye needs to be in order to see every edge and corner. I guess that someone with shallow eye sockets and narrow, flexible glasses might be able to happily use any viewfinder. Generally though, a larger eye point value will mean a viewfinder that's easier to use with glasses. A larger size and magnification can be great too, but for an electronic viewfinder the refresh rate and resolution are then relevant too.

Manufacturers list the eye-point rating for their cameras in their detailed specs so it's fairly easy to check. To give a comparison, here are some of the most popular cameras around at the moment with their eye-point values:

Fujifilm X-T2 - 23mm
Fujifilm X-E2s - 23mm
Sony A7 mk2 - 22.1mm
Sony A6500 - 21.4mm
Canon 5D mk4 - 21mm
Canon 6D mk2 - 21mm
Canon 1D X mk2 - 20mm
Sony RX100 mk5 - 19.2mm
Canon Rebel T7 - 19mm
Canon Rebel T5 - 19mm
Canon SL2 - 19mm
Sony A9 - 18.5mm
Nikon D7500 - 18.5mm
Sony A7R mk2 - 18.5mm
Sony A7S mk2 - 18.5mm
Sony RX1R mk2 - 18.4mm
SonyA99 mk2 - 18.3mm
Nikon D3400 - 18mm
Fujifilm X-T20 - 17.5mm
Nikon D810 - 17mm
Nikon D5 - 17mm
Nikon D5600 - 17mm
Fujifilm X-Pro2 - 16mm
Nikon D500 - 16mm
Fujifilm X100F - 15mm

Unfortunately Olympus and Panasonic only list eye relief in terms of distance from the glass, rather than the edge of the eye piece, so it's impossible to compare them directly with the other manufacturers and I've excluded them for that reason.

Personally I don't know exactly what eye relief I need with my current glasses but I estimate it's about 19 or 20mm.

If you wear glasses, how do you get on with the viewfinder? Any tips or tricks? Or are there any cameras you'd like me to add to the list?

Fujifilm X-T1 viewfinder

Fujifilm X-T1 viewfinder

Fujifilm X-T1 viewfinder with split screen manual focus assist

Fujifilm X-T1 viewfinder with split screen manual focus assist

Fujifilm X-T10 (left, 17.5mm eye relief) vs. X-T1 (23mm)

Fujifilm X-T10 (left, 17.5mm eye relief) vs. X-T1 (23mm)